• Núria Estapé, science journalist

    Microbiota – the skinai??i??s “flora”

    31 Aug Microbiota - the skinai??i??s "flora"

    , siti sicuri per comprare viagra best online viagra site, best online viagra site, best online viagra site, best online viagra site, best online viagra site, best online viagra site, best online viagra site, best online viagra site, best online viagra site, best online viagra site, best online viagra site, best online viagra site, best online viagra site, best online viagra site, best online viagra site, best online viagra site, best online viagra site, best online viagra site. , siti sicuri per comprare viagra, siti sicuri per comprare viagra, siti sicuri per comprare viagra, siti sicuri per comprare viagra. Microbiota - the skinai??i??s "flora" Our skin is a balanced ecosystem. Since it was colonized by billions of bacteria, viruses, fungi and mites at the dawn of the evolution of hominids, many species of microorganisms have lived in symbiosis with our skin mantle cells. Scienceai??i??s efforts to identify our colonizers have revealed how essential these microorganisms are for the health of our skin. The most natural way to healthy skin is to help maintain the balance between all these microorganisms.

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    Although it may be difficult to credit, only 10% of the cells of the bodyai??i??s skin, intestines and mucous membranes are human. Most of them are of microscopic organisms that belong to the microbiota, the set of all foreign microbes that live in our body, especially in the digestive organs and the skin. For example, each square centimetre of human skin contains approximately one million microorganisms from a hundred different species. Together these form the skinai??i??s microbiota (traditionally called the skinai??i??s "floraai???). This ecosystem is comparable in complexity to any other system in the Earthai??i??s mantle. Today we know that our skin has hosted these microorganisms over thousands of years of evolution and that it is the symbiosis between our own cells and these tiny guests which helps the skin to perform its primary function of acting as a protective physical barrier. Read More

  • Anna Solana, science journalist

    Children: When Things Get Itchy

    7 Apr Children: When Things Get Itchy

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    Children: When Things Get ItchyTheir skin is immature and more susceptible to aggression from the world around them, which makes it easier for them to get scratches, rashes and infections. They run, jump, play and sometimes get hurt. Their skin breaks out, they scratch it and don't want to apply cream. But it seems like everything they get eventually goes away and they go back to normal. But children's skin also needs basic care.

     

    Once they get past the nappy rashes and unexplained red patches of their baby years that finally disappear with patience and the application of moisturizer and repair cream, it seems like the only thing to worry about to keep a child's skin healthy is daily hygiene and sunscreen. You might also remember to cut out the labels from their clothing, since they are usually made of scratchy, synthetic material. Read More

  • Núria Estapé, science journalist

    The colours of our skin

    7 Mar The colours of our skin

    The human species has three broad ethnic types: black, Asian and Caucasian. This division, if not scientifically accurate, is convenient. Skin colour reveals, almost always at a glance, what ethnic type we belong to. But the difference in skins is not just a matter of pigmentation. The characteristics of the stratum corneum, glands and microflora also affect how skins age and what risks they face.

     

    When comparing the appearance of black, white and Asian people, we often refer to skin colour. Ethnic differences are showcased by the bodyai??i??s largest organ, the skin. But is colour the only difference between skins? Do different skins age differently? Which skins are more sensitive to chemical and environmental damage? Read More

  • Fede Montagud, editor

    Babies: a daily bath?

    17 Feb Babies: a daily bath?

    Newborns are vulnerable, yet are often stronger than they look. Adults instinctively feel the need to protect them and this sometimes means excessive care that is counterproductive. Keeping a babyai??i??s skin clean and healthy, for example, is not complicated.

     

    Newbie parents are often assailed by doubts about the abundance of skin care products and tips regarding babiesai??i?? skin. Everyone naturally wants the best for their newborn baby, so paediatricians at the Mayo Clinic recently issued some recommendations in the india viagra on line, india viagra on line, india viagra on line, india viagra on line, india viagra on line, india viagra on line, india viagra on line, india viagra on line. International Journal of Dermatology. The most surprising recommendation is to forego the widespread custom of daily bathing and bathe the baby only every second day. On non-bathing days the body and face (including the eyes and eyelids) can be cleaned with just a water-dampened washcloth. As for the bath, tap water is fine and products, if used, should be gentle, dye- and fragrance-free and with a pH between 4.7 and 5.5. After changing nappies, the baby can be cleaned up using a little water and the naked skin should then be allowed to breathe for a while. Baby wipes should be hypoallergenic and without lanolin or alcohol. For nappy rash, a zinc oxide-based product can be used.

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